global issues

This page is for suggested global issue links dealing with environment or nature.  If you have any suggestions please send them through.

 

 

 

 

is building a global grassroots movement to solve the climate crisis. Our online campaigns, grassroots organizing, and mass public actions are led from the bottom up by thousands of volunteer organizers in over 188 countries.

350 means climate safety. To preserve our planet, scientists tell us we must reduce the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere from its current level of 392 parts per million to below 350 ppm. But 350 is more than a number—it’s a symbol of where we need to head as a planet.

350.org works hard to organize in a new way—everywhere at once, using online tools to facilitate strategic offline action. We want to be a laboratory for the best ways to strengthen the climate movement and catalyze transformation around the world.

We operate at a large scale to take on the world’s greatest challenge. In October of 2009 we coordinated 5200 simultaneous rallies and demonstrations in 181 countries, what CNN called the ‘most widespread day of political action in the planet’s history.’ On 10/10/10, we organized a day of climate solutions projects–from solar panel installations to community garden plantings–and changed communities from the bottom up with over 7,000 events in 188 countries. And at the end of last year, we coordinated a climate art project so large it had to be photographed from a satellite in outer space.

In 2011, we are building people power in every corner of the planet. With a huge mobilization planned for September and a series of bold campaigns in strategic countries around the world, we’ve got big plans. With the help of millions of people, we’ll create a wave a hard-hitting climate activism all over the world that can lead to real, lasting, large-scale change.

We think we can turn the tide on the climate crisis–but only if we work together. If an international grassroots movement holds our leaders accountable to realities of science and principles of justice, we can realize the solutions that will ensure a better future for all.

Or to put it another way…

With over 4000 languages spoken around the world, words don’t always get the point accross.

To transcend the language barrier we made this wordless animation that explains 350.org in 90 seconds:

 

Peak Oil? Fact or fallacy?

“The Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s Catalyst programme has just broadcast the best peak oil documentary in recent times. In just 12 minutes it covers many of the essential points, and is a great way to get yourself up to speed on peak oil. Please take the time to watch it, and share this Youtube link and the ABC Catalyst link with your networks, and with anyone you believe is unaware of, or in denial about peak oil.

Peak oil – Fact or fallacy?

Published on Denis Tegg’s blog 17 May 2011
 
The Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s Catalyst programme has just broadcast the best peak oil documentary in recent times. In just 12 minutes it covers many of the essential points, and is a great way to get yourself up to speed on peak oil. Please take the time to watch it, and share this Youtube link and the ABC Catalyst link with your networks, and with anyone you believe is unaware of, or in denial about peak oil.

Highlights —

* The International Energy Agency (IEA) has confirmed that global conventional crude oil production peaked in 2006
* The IEA’s estimate as to how world production will be maintained and grow marginally in the next 20 years is impossibly optimistic and simply not credible. The IEA’s projections imply a rate of production which is three times historical levels
* Even so the IEA’s chief economist Dr Fatih Birol issues several stark warnings. He says existing oilfields are depleting so fast that just to maintain production at present levels we need to find four new Saudi Arabia’s
* Birol warns of rapidly rising oil prices, a greater risk of oil wars, and severe economic impacts globally
* And Birol warns that governments (including New Zealand’s which relies heavily on the IEA advice) should have started tackling the peak oil problem at least 10 years ago.
* Dr Jeremy Leggett and Chris Skrebowski of the UK Taskforce on Peak Oil offer even more dire warnings of an oil crunch no later than 2015 and possibly much earlier. They say the decline in world exports will be rapid and may even generate a collapse as oil producers keep more of their own oil. The outcome for New Zealand which imports two thirds of its oil will be especially severe.
* The program also examines the environmental and economic risks of drilling for extreme oil in ultra deep-water, as proposed offshore in New Zealand.

The Catalyst website has extended interviews with Fatih Birol, and peak oil experts Kjell Aleklett of Sweden, and Dr Jeremy Leggett and Chris Skrebowski of the United Kingdom. These are well worth taking the time to watch. The projections from Leggett in particular are clear, coherent and as he puts it “blowing a big whistle”. There is also extended comment from Prof Robert Rea – a US expert in the offshore oil industry.

The ABC documentary has another message. It once again reveals the parlous state of current affairs reporting in New Zealand. Australia’s state broadcaster tackles meaty issues like the oil crisis, while Kiwis are fed a relentless diet of cooking shows and other trivia. Where is the coverage on Sunday, 60 Minutes, CloseUp or Campbell Live or in feature articles in our print media?
 

Highlights —

  • The International Energy Agency (IEA) has confirmed that global conventional crude oil production peaked in 2006
  • The IEA’s estimate as to how world production will be maintained and grow marginally in the next 20 years is impossibly optimistic and simply not credible. The IEA’s projections imply a rate of production which is three times historical levels
  • Even so the IEA’s chief economist Dr Fatih Birol issues several stark warnings. He says existing oilfields are depleting so fast that just to maintain production at present levels we need to find four new Saudi Arabia’s
  • Birol warns of rapidly rising oil prices, a greater risk of oil wars, and severe economic impacts globally
  • And Birol warns that governments (including New Zealand’s which relies heavily on the IEA advice) should have started tackling the peak oil problem at least 10 years ago.
  • Dr Jeremy Leggett and Chris Skrebowski of the UK Taskforce on Peak Oil offer even more dire warnings of an oil crunch no later than 2015 and possibly much earlier. They say the decline in world exports will be rapid and may even generate a collapse as oil producers keep more of their own oil. The outcome for New Zealand which imports two thirds of its oil will be especially severe.
  • The program also examines the environmental and economic risks of drilling for extreme oil in ultra deep-water, as proposed offshore in New Zealand.

The Catalyst website has extended interviews with Fatih Birol, and peak oil experts Kjell Aleklett of Sweden, and Dr Jeremy Leggett and Chris Skrebowski of the United Kingdom. These are well worth taking the time to watch. The projections from Leggett in particular are clear, coherent and as he puts it “blowing a big whistle”. There is also extended comment from Prof Robert Rea – a US expert in the offshore oil industry.

The ABC documentary has another message. It once again reveals the parlous state of current affairs reporting in New Zealand. Australia’s state broadcaster tackles meaty issues like the oil crisis, while Kiwis are fed a relentless diet of cooking shows and other trivia. Where is the coverage on Sunday, 60 Minutes, CloseUp or Campbell Live or in feature articles in our print media?”